Dick-Taters


(Reuters) – U.S. President Barack Obama on Wednesday sharply criticized the Venezuelan government for arresting protesters and urged the government to focus on the “legitimate grievances” of its people. Read More

Calling for “all hands on deck” to assist the economy, President Barack Obama is urging his Cabinet to identify ways to keep his administration relevant to people struggling in the up-and-down recovery. Read More

And the GOP/Tea Party and constituents have allowed this shit to happen.

“Peanuts” cartoonist Charles Schulz made an enduring contribution to American political life with his famous sequence in which insistent promises by Lucy not to pull away the football overcome Charlie Brown’s hard experience with her unfailing practice of doing so. At the moment, this happens to be a perfect metaphor for what Iran’s newly elected president, Hasan Rouhani, has in store for Barack Obama.
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Citgo confirmed with KHOU 11 News that its flags, including the U.S. flag, would be lowered for the late president. The company said it would release a statement later in the day. More Here

Say it ain’t so, Joe, or should I say Jose?

Poor Joe Kennedy, mourning the loss of his grand amigo, “El Comandante,” the tinpot Latin American thug who put the “profit” back in “non-profit” for the Kennedy kleptocracy.

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Also: Sean Penn and Oliver Stone R Sad

Chavez allegedly died Tuesday March 5th.

Just kiddin’. Obama would never cancel a golf game, no matter what.

By FOSTER KLUG and YOUKYUNG LEE
Associated Press

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea vowed Tuesday to cancel the 1953 cease-fire that ended the Korean War, citing a U.S.-led push for punishing U.N. sanctions over its recent nuclear test and ongoing U.S.-South Korean joint military drills.

Without elaborating, the Korean People’s Army Supreme Command warned of “surgical strikes” meant to unify the divided Korean Peninsula and of an indigenous, “precision nuclear striking tool.” The statement came amid reports that Washington and North Korean ally Beijing have approved a draft of a U.N. Security Council resolution calling for sanctions in response to North Korea’s Feb. 12 nuclear test. The draft is expected to be circulated at the U.N. this week.

Such heated military rhetoric and threats are common from North Korea as tensions rise on the Korean Peninsula, and Pyongyang’s recent nuclear test and rocket launches, and the subsequent call for U.N. punishment, have increased already high animosity between the North and Washington and ally Seoul.

The United States and others worry that North Korea’s third nuclear test takes it a big step closer toward its goal of having nuclear-armed missiles that can reach America, and condemn its nuclear and missile efforts as threats to regional security and a drain on the resources that could go to North Korea’s largely destitute people.

North Korea says its nuclear program is a response to U.S. hostility that dates back to the 1950-53 Korean War, which ended with an armistice, not a peace treaty, leaving the Korean Peninsula still technically in a state of war.

Even amid the tension, North Korea has welcomed high-profile visitors, including former basketball star Dennis Rodman, known for his piercings and tattoos – and his Hall of Fame career with the Detroit Pistons and Chicago Bulls.

Rodman met the North Korean leader, Kim Jong Un, called him an “awesome guy” and said Kim wanted President Barack Obama to call him. The trip was criticized for giving the authoritarian leader a propaganda boost, but Rodman suggested “basketball diplomacy” could warm relations. Google’s executive chairman, Eric Schmidt, made a four-day trip in January, but did not meet Kim.

North Korea warned in its statement that it will cancel the 60-year-old armistice agreement on March 11, when two weeks of U.S.-South Korean military drills that began earlier this month draw 10,000 South Korean and 3,500 U.S. forces. The statement called the drills a “dangerous nuclear war targeted at us.”

North Korea also said it will block a communications line between it and the United States at the border village separating the two Koreas.

“We aim to launch surgical strikes at any time and any target without being bounded by the armistice accord and advance our long-cherished wish for national unification,” the statement said.

North Korea lays the blame for its much-condemned nuclear weapons programs on the United States.

A rich vein of North Korean propaganda, fueled by decades-old, Cold War-era American threats, holds that the North remains at risk of an unprovoked nuclear attack. Washington and others say brinksmanship is the North’s true motive for the nuclear push.

By MICHELE SALCEDO
Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Call me? Maybe?

North Korea’s young leader has riled the U.S. with recent nuclear tests, but Kim Jong Un doesn’t really want war with the superpower, just a call from President Barack Obama to chat about their shared love of basketball, according to erstwhile diplomat Dennis Rodman, the ex-NBA star just back from an improbable visit to the reclusive communist country.

“He loves basketball. … I said Obama loves basketball. Let’s start there” as a way to warm up relations between U.S. and North Korea, Rodman told ABC’s “This Week.”

“He asked me to give Obama something to say and do one thing. He wants Obama to do one thing, call him,” said Rodman, who called the authoritarian leader an “awesome guy” during his trip. The State Department criticized North Korea last week for “wining and dining’ Rodman while its own people go hungry.

Rodman also said Kim told him, “I don’t want to do war. I don’t want to do war.”

Yet in January, after the U.N. Security Council voted to condemn the North’s successful rocket launch in December and expand penalties against Kim’s government, his National Defense Commission said in a statement that “settling accounts with the U.S. needs to be done with force, not with words.” The statement also promised “a new phase of the anti-U.S. struggle that has lasted century after century.”

North Korea and the U.S. fought on opposite sides of the three-year Korean War, which ended in a truce in 1953. The foes technically remain at war. They never signed a peace treaty and do not have diplomatic relations.

Rodman was the highest-profile American to meet Kim since Kim inherited power from father Kim Jong Il in 2011. He traveled to the secretive state with the Harlem Globetrotters team for a new HBO series produced by New York-based VICE television.

The visit took place amid rising tensions between the countries.

North Korea conducted an underground nuclear test two weeks ago, making clear the provocative act was a warning to the United States to drop what it considers a “hostile” policy toward the North.

Rodman said he was aware of North Korea’s human rights record, which the State Department has characterized as one of the worst in the world, but said he wasn’t apologizing for Kim.

“He’s a good guy to me,” Rodman said, adding, that “as a person to person, he’s my friend. I don’t condone what he does.”

Basketball is popular in North Korea, and Thursday’s exhibition game with two Americans playing on each time alongside North Koreans ended in a 110-110 tie. Following the game Kim threw an “epic feast” for the group, plying them with food and drinks and making round after round of toasts.

Rodman’s trip was the second attention-grabbing American visit this year to North Korea. Google’s executive chairman, Eric Schmidt, made a four-day trip in January, but did not meet Kim.

Rodman said he planned to go back to North Korea to “find out more what’s really going on.”

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, left, and former NBA star Dennis Rodman watch North Korean and U.S. players in an exhibition basketball game at an arena in Pyongyang, North Korea, Thursday, Feb. 28, 2013.

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Ex-NBA star Dennis Rodman hung out Thursday with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un on the third day of his improbable journey with VICE to Pyongyang, watching the Harlem Globetrotters with the leader and later dining on sushi and drinking with him at his palace.

“You have a friend for life,” Rodman told Kim before a crowd of thousands at a gymnasium where they sat side by side, chatting as they watched players from North Korea and the U.S. play, Alex Detrick, a spokesman for the New York-based VICE media company, told The Associated Press.

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